Dr. Gary W. Rubloff
Home
Research Topics
Process diagnostics, sensing, metrology, and control
Semiconductor manufacturing processes and equipment
Systems modeling, simulation, and optimization
Engineered learning systems

Recent Results

Publications
Presentations

Teaching

Current class
Experience

Other

Facilities
Research group
CV
Connections

Contacts & maps

Collaborations

Collaborators' corner
Internal-group
External-restricted
 

Other:
Consumer reports

Counter by digits.com

All materials at this site are copyrighted 2003 by the University of Maryland
1996-2003, all rights reserved

Overview of Course

Instructor:                     Gary W. Rubloff

Professor, Dept. of Materials and Nuclear Engineering, and Institute for Systems Research
Affiliate Professor, Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Mon & Wed,   3:30 4:45,   ChemNuc 2140

Class Mon & Wed 3:30pm - 4:45pm ChemNuc (CHE, Bldg 090)
Room 2140 computer classroom
Instructor Gary W. Rubloff
main office A.V. Williams 2145

 
x52949

rubloff@isr.umd.edu
Office hours Mon & Wed before class 2:00pm - 3:00pm main office A.V. Williams 2145
(or by appt in MSE office ChemNuc 2309, x50499)
Prerequisites Required: permission of the instructor and ENES 230 (Introduction to Materials and Their Applications) or equivalent
Recommended: ENMA 460 (Physics of Solid Materials) or equivalent
Textbook Silicon VLSI Technology: Fundamentals, Practice and Modeling 
James D. Plummer, Michael D. Deal, and Peter B. Griffin (Prentice-Hall)
Research projects Team projects, 3-5 people each, comprising research investigations and/or modeling and simulation of key materials and processes
Grading Homework
Class participation
Midterm exam
Research project
Final exam
15%
15%
15%
30%
25%
 

DESCRIPTION 

The course provides an overview of the microprocessing - and indeed nanoprocessing - of materials as used in the fabrication of ultrathin layers and structures of materials for use in semiconductors and other devices based on thin film fabrication.  Key processes are explored with respect to their underlying chemistry and physics, the relation of these processes to resulting materials properties and microscale/nanoscale topography, the manufacturing equipment used to achieve success microprocessing, and fundamental interactions between process steps which determine the performance of micrstructures and nanostructures.  Simulation exercises and research projects provide an opportunity to explore key concepts in the course, to develop useful modeling skills,  and to actively pursue a research question in a team setting.  The student will (1) develop skills in identifying, understanding, and exploiting fundamental mechanisms in microprocesses, and (2) gain a meaningful perspective on how this understanding can be used in industrial applications of microprocessing as employed in technologies for silicon ULSI, compound semiconductors, optoelectronics, displays, data storage, and microelectromechanical systems.